Common Immigration Questions

Common Immigration Questions

Our Miami immigration and deportation defense lawyers are committed to ensuring that you receive the most important information regarding your immigration matter. We are available to answer any additional questions you may have about immigration law and how it applies to your case.

Contact us today for a free in-office consultation in our Miami office (305) 858-2323.

Q. Am I eligible for an I601-A/Provisional Waiver based on the expansion?

A. In 2016, Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers were expanded to include individuals with approved and available immigrant visa petitions who are the spouses, sons and daughters, or certain children (17 or older) of Lawful Permanent Residents, not just U.S. Citizens. Not only does this apply to family-based petitions, it also applies to employment-based petitions and those selected to participate in the Diversity Visa Program.

Additionally, the expansion also includes those who have orders of removal with approved applications to reapply for admission, including those who have reentered after being removed from the United States if the removal order has not been reinstated by CBP or ICE.

This expansion creates a pathway to residency for those that were otherwise ineligible.

Q. How will President Obama's Deferred Action / Executive Order impact my status?
A. There's the possibility of getting work authorization and a renewable deferral of your removal. In Florida, this immigration plan could also result in the issuance of a driver's license and work authorization. Of course, each case is unique and requires guidance from an experienced immigration attorney. For more information, schedule a free in-office case evaluation today with Mr. Revilla.

Q. What are removal proceedings?
A. These are proceedings conducted in Immigration Court to determine a person’s removability or inadmissibility to the United States. In these proceedings a person can apply for certain benefits under the Immigration and Nationality Act which may give the person legal status in the U.S.

Q. Do I need to hire an immigration attorney for removal proceedings?
A. Yes, removal proceedings involve complex areas of immigration law. Removal proceedings are very important in that they determine whether or not somebody will be deported from the United States. At a removal proceeding, an Immigration Judge will determine whether you are ordered deported from the United States. It is highly recommended that you retain an experienced immigration attorney.

Q. What is a master calendar hearing?
A. This is preliminary hearing where the charges of inadmissibility or removability are addressed by the Immigration Court. At this hearing, the Immigration Court will also determine a person’s eligibility for relief under the Immigration and Nationality Act. This hearing is generally held along with many other individuals who are also scheduled for master calendar hearings.

Q. What is an individual hearing?
A. This is a hearing where the Immigration Court hears testimony and reviews evidence to determine if a person should be granted relief. The Immigration Court will also hold an individual hearing to determine whether a charge of removability or inadmissibility should be sustained. This hearing is generally held outside the presence of other Respondents.

Q. What if I have an order of removal or deportation and I am now married to a United States citizen or a Cuba resident?
A. You may be able to motion the court to reopen (or eliminate the order of removal or deportation) your removal proceedings so that you may be able to apply for residency. It is often the case that a person will need the agreement of the Office of the Chief Counsel to motion the Immigration Court to reopen a case.

Q. What is a motion to reopen?
A. This is where the court is requested or moved to reopen removal proceedings where a decision is final. This often occurs when an order of removal has been issued and it is requested that the court rescind or eliminate the order of removal.

Q. What is a joint motion to reopen?
A. This is a motion to reopen that requires the agreement of the Office of the Chief Counsel because of time or numerical limitations placed on motions to reopen by the Immigration and Nationality Act.

ABOUT REVILLA LAW FIRM, P.A.

At Revilla Law Firm, P.A., we have an excellent reputation throughout the legal community and other immigration lawyers often send their most complex cases and issues to us. Our Miami immigration lawyers always do their best to ensure that you receive a favorable outcome in your case.

Revilla Law Firm handles countless immigration appeals before the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) and U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals. Revilla Law Firm, P.A. is a deportation defense firm which handles removal proceedings, deportation proceedings, bond hearings, motions to reopen, motions to reconsider, and all other immigration matters.

Our immigration defense practice also concentrates on family-based visas and employment-based visas with the goal of achieving adjustment of status to that of lawful permanent resident status.

If you require additional information about any immigration issue, contact Revilla Law Firm today for a free in-office consultation (305) 858-2323. Our Miami Immigration Lawyers are committed to protecting our clients by providing aggressive representation in all immigration matters.

Miami Immigration and Deportation Defense Lawyers

2250 SW 3rd Avenue, Suite 501

Miami, FL 33129

Phone: (305) 858-2323

Fax: (305) 858-2321

The Immigration Lawyers at Revilla Law Firm, P.A., in Miami, Florida, represent clients throughout the state of Florida, including Aventura, Boca Raton, Bradenton, Clearwater, Coconut Grove, Coral Gables, Coral Springs, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Fort Pierce, Hialeah, Hollywood, Homestead, Kendall, Key West, Lake Worth, Melbourne, Miami, Miami Beach, Naples, Orlando, Palm Beach, Palm Springs, Pompano Beach, Sarasota, St. Petersburg, Sebring, Tampa, Titusville, Vero Beach, and Brevard County, Broward County, Collier County, Highlands County, Hillsborough County, Indian River County, Lee County, Manatee County, Martin County, Miami-Dade County, Monroe County, Orange County, Palm Beach County, Pinellas County, St. Lucie County, and including the Lake Okeechobee area, FL.